The voice makes a difference in non-fiction as well

We often talk about voice in fiction, but equal attention should be given to voice in non-fiction. In fact, if you give your non-fiction a voice appropriate to your topic, you will increase the odds that readers will stick with it until the end.

For many non-fiction topics, an entertaining voice will keep readers interested. I know I enjoy computer books by Scott Kelby just because he has such a humorous slant on things. The topic of his book might be the same as that of another author, but I’ll choose his every time because I know it will be informative and entertaining.

Some non-fiction, however, does not lend itself to a humorous or entertaining voice. This does not mean that your non-fiction writing needs to be dry and boring. On the contrary, it’s your job as a writer to make your subject interesting to those who plunk down their hard-earned money to buy it.

It’s best to try out several different voices on your non-fiction before your write. Write the first chapter several different ways as an experiment. For example, try writing it in any of the following voices…

humorous

funny

entertaining

flamboyant

subdued

sarcastic

flowery… etc.

I know this takes some time, but by completing this exercise, you’ll find a voice or a hybrid combination of voices that will fit you and the piece that you are writing. It’ll be worth the time.

 

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About loubelcher

I'm a freelance artist and writer. I enjoy anything whimsical and my art and writing generally concentrate on the lighter side of life.
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One Response to The voice makes a difference in non-fiction as well

  1. Just passing through and enjoyed the article.

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